Someone’s in the Kitchen with Dinah

And what a story it is, sitting cozily in Genesis 34.

Again, it is an account told without commentary.

Women’s rights campaigners will not be happy.  Dinah, the rape victim has no voice at all.  Was she just at the wrong place at the wrong time? Did her “friends” set her up?  Was she perhaps successfully wooed by the Hivite chief’s popular and persuasive son? What happened to her afterward?  How did she feel about the carnage carried out on her behalf? What did she say to her former girlfriends, now captives and slaves to her family? We are given no hint.

And her Father, Jacob, now Israel.  He doesn’t precisely step up to the plate to his only daughter’s defense.  He dumps the responsibility on her brothers.  After the fact, and in his death-bed curse, he castigates Simeon and Levi for their violence, but where was his leadership at the time.  Why didn’t he at least say, “No”?

And then there is the be-smitten Shechem.  Possession by rape, and then protestations of love. “Get me this woman for my wife.” “No bride-price is too high.”

And his pitch to the greedy towns folks- “Just be circumcised, and all that is theirs will be ours as we absorb them into our culture.”  “Why not?” Religious significance – nope, a thought for the God of the Hebrews – nope, just profit motive.

And of course we have, the Knights-in-Tarnished Armor- Dinah’s brothers,  proving for sure that the most effective lie is one strengthened by a healthy truth.  But how dare they use the sign of their covenant with God to work an unholy scheme?

And then there is the outcome.  The Hivite men lie dead. Their wives, children and all they have fall to the Hebrews- and in fact the two groups get merged, but not as the Hivites envisioned. Dinah is restored to the bosom of her family.

In the final act Jacob cleans out all the foreign idols, including, presumably, the new ones acquired at Shechem. He takes his family  back to the House of God, and the true worship, and is given divine protection against attack as he moves his people out. . The covenant promises are renewed.

Should our sister be treated as a prostitute?  Apparently not.

It does make the eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth of the Mosaic Law, seem most restrained and reasonable, in its meting out of just desserts, though.

Do I have a handle on this story?  I’m looking for one. After all, all scripture is inspired by God and is profitable . . .

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1 Comment »

  1. Of course, Shechem didn’t exactly treat Dinah as a prostitute- he kept her in his house, and offered to marry her with all due cost and ceremony. He didn’t offer her a young goat and send her away.

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